Domínguez en Bratislava | Óscar Domínguez
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Domínguez en Bratislava

Domínguez en Bratislava

Nueva publicación del profesor Pavel Štěpánek sobre la trayectoria checa de Óscar Domínguez. Véase en «Óscar Domínguez en Bratislava en 1949: entre París y Checoslovaquia, en la frontera entre el realismo socialista político y la libertad de expresión», in Romanistica Comeniana, ed. Bohdan Ulašin, Bratislava, s. 77-90. ISSN 2585-8483.

Romanistica Comeniana 1/2019. ROMANISTICA COMENIANA is a peer-reviewed academic journal, published since 2018 by the Department of Romance Languages at the Faculty of Arts, Comenius University in Bratislava. It is concerned with Romance linguistic and cultural areas, especially in the context of mutual relations, analogies, and dierences with Central Europe and its languages. The journal publishes original articles on linguistics, literary science, translatology, didactics, intercultural relations, and history; survey articles; reviews of publications (within three years of their publication), and reports on relevant and current events in Romance studies. The journal is published twice a year and accepts texts in Slovak, Czech, the Romance languages and English.

ÓSCAR DOMÍNGUEZ IN BRATISLAVA IN 1949:

BETWEEN PARIS AND CZECHOSLOVAKIA,

ON THE BORDER BETWEEN POLITICAL SOCIALIST REALISM

AND THE FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION

One of the most important Spanish painters of the 20th Century, Óscar Domínguez, had a relationship with Czechoslovakia, which is now the Czech and Slovak Republics. He became member of the School of Paris. After the Second World War the Czechoslovak government

organized a great exhibition in Prague of Spanish artists who were resident in Paris at that time. Domínguez was invited to organize a one man exhibition in Prague, Olomouc, and Bratislava. His exhibition was presented here just at the time the communist theory of “socialist realism” was being introduced into Czechoslovakia and other styles and movements were being depreciated and marginalized. We can thus consider his exhibition in Bratislava as the last exhibition of the democratic period between 1945 and 1949.



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